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David P. Farrington

University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

Advances in Research on Bullying, Offending and Psychopathy

Participants: Hannah Gaffney1, Ivana Sekol2; Miguel Basto-Pereira3; Henriette Bergstrøm2

1University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); 2University of Derby (United Kingdom); 3ISPA—Instituto Universitário Lisbon (Portugal)

Symposium Summary

Introduction: This symposium presents new research on bullying in schools, bullying in residential institutions for children and adolescents, early predictors of offending, and the development of psychopathy throughout the lifespan. Methods: Hannah Gaffney, David P. Farrington and Maria M.Ttofi present a systematic review of the effective components of bullying prevention programmes in schools. Ivana Sekol and David P. Farrington present findings from a national survey of 601 children and young people on bullying and victimization in Croatian children’s homes and correctional institutions. Miguel Basto-Pereira and David P. Farrington present a systematic review of the results of meta-analyses of the early predictors of offending. Finally, Henriette Bergstrom and David P. Farrington present results from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, which is a prospective longitudinal study of 411 London males from age 8 to age 61, on psychopathy and offending at different ages from adolescence to adulthood. Results: Particular intervention components are associated with larger effect sizes of school bullying prevention programmes. The most important predictors of bullying and victimization in Croatian institutions are presented. The most important early predictors of offending are identified. Psychopathy at different ages was associated with long criminal careers. Discussion: The findings presented in this symposium provide useful information on: (a) what components to include in effective anti-bullying programmes; (b) how to identify children and young people who are at risk of bullying or victimization in institutions; (c) how to identify children and young people who are at risk of later offending; and (d) the need to intervene early to prevent the development of psychopathy.

Short CV

David P. Farrington is Emeritus Professor of Psychological Criminology at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University. He received the Stockholm Prize in Criminology in 2013. He was President of the American Society of Criminology in 1998-99 (the first and only person from outside North America to be elected to this office). He is the first and only person to receive the four major awards of the American Society of Criminology: the Edwin Sutherland Award in 2002 for outstanding contributions to criminology, the Sellin-Glueck Award in 1984 for international contributions to criminology, the August Vollmer Award in 2014 for outstanding contributions to the prevention of delinquency, and the Herbert Bloch Award in 2018 for outstanding service contributions to criminology. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, of the Academy of Medical Sciences, of the British Psychological Society, of the American Society of Criminology, and of the International Society for Research on Aggression. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society, and an Honorary Life Member of the British Society of Criminology and of the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology.

He is a Chartered Forensic Psychologist, joint editor of the journal Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, and a member of the editorial boards of several other journals. His major research interest is in developmental criminology, and he is Director of the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, which is a prospective longitudinal survey of over 400 London males from age 8 to age 61.  In addition to 777 published journal articles and book chapters on criminological and psychological topics, he has published 111 books, monographs and government publications, and 156 shorter publications (total = 1,044). According to GoogleScholar on March 18, 2019, his work had been cited 90,314 times; his h-index was 158, which means that 158 of his publications had at least 158 citations, and his i10-index was 655, which means that 655 of his publications had at least 10 citations.

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